Hilton Head tops another list of best US islands in 2021.

America has weighed in again: Hilton Head Island is one of the top islands in the world, according to a poll of Condé Nast Traveler readers. Hilton Head was ranked as the best island in the United States during the travel magazine’s 2021 Readers’ Choice Awards. The results were released Tuesday. This is the fifth consecutive year that Hilton Head has topped the list of best U.S. islands in Condé Nast’s poll. Read more at: https://www.islandpacket.com/news/local/article254771057.html#storylink=cpy

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From the Desk of the GM

As we move into the fall months and hurricane season, I wanted to make you all aware thatMeredith Elmore has been promoted to Assistant General Manager. She has completed 24 years ofservice to Shipyard, earned her Doctorate in Management/Organizational Theory, and achieved aCAI property manager designation. Over these 24 years, she has taken on every task we have sent herway from Beach Club operations to communications efforts, human resources, and oversight of officeoperations. Her service has been invaluable, and I know you will congratulate her as we have for herexcellent work. We are all working diligently on the budget for …

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Nature Notes

JOANNE VOULELIS, LOWCOUNTRY MASTER NATURALIST, COASTAL DISCOVERY MUSEUM: What Happens to Animals During a Hurricane?While humans rely on weather reports to forecast an impending hurricane, many animals can sense a storm well inadvance and get out of harm’s way. Changes in barometric pressure, for instance, are warning signs for birds, sharks and some other species to quickly seek safety. But where do they go?Many marine animals such as whales, dolphins, sharks and manatees will swim into deeper water to find refuge, but this is no guarantee. Sea turtles are adept at navigating waters during severe storms, but high surf can …

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Owner Updates

Owner Updates Important Reminders from the Welcome Center • WELCOME CENTER HOURS – Effective May 3rd, normal business hours resumed in the Welcome Center from 8am-4pm Monday through Friday and 8am-noon on weekends. For your convenience, we also have a new drop box on the front porch. Feel free to drop locker and Beach Club payments etc. off there anytime. Should you require a receipt, just make a notation on your remittance and we will email/mail you one promptly. • BE A GOOD NEIGHBOR – Respecting Private Property – There have been several complaints regarding use of private property over …

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Employee Spotlight

Malcolm Madison is another “Comeback Kid”, as this is his second time working on the Shipyard security team. He came back as a gate officer in spring 2020, and quickly worked his way back up into a patrol role. Madison is from Alma, GA and currently resides in Savannah. He has a wonderful son who is graduating from high school this month, so he is a very proud dad at the moment. He enjoys wrestling and reading, especially about American history, in his spare time. He also enjoys mentoring youth via a program that he has been involved with for …

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Know Your Neighbor – Mary Alice Tartler

Mary Alice relocated from the DC Metropolitan area to Hilton Head Island after retiring from the U.S. Government just over 19 years ago. Upon retiring, she devoted her free time to improving her skills as a photographer, with an emphasis on the wildlife of the Lowcountry. Mary Alice has been the Shipyard photographer for the past 6 years, including photos for POA ads in local magazines (Hilton Head Monthly, Celebrate Hilton Head (CH2), and Local Life), as well as images for this newsletter. She also routinely photographs Shipyard owner events, provides website images, conducts photography classes, serves as judge for …

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Nature News

Holes on The Beach, Part II In the last issue of The Anchor, Nature Notes discussed several holes that are naturally occurring on the beach. This article will focus on those holes made by marine animals. The Georgia ghost shrimp live underneath the sand near the water’s edge and are rarely seen (thus the name). Their burrows can be 6 feet deep even though the opening is about the size of a coin. During high tide, they venture out of the opening (while still under water), to feed from drifting particles of organic matter. The “sprinkles” that often surround the …

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